Friday, 20 July 2012

The end is within sniffing distance...

75,000 words into novel 3 and only seven scenes left to write. So close to the end, right?

Wrong!

I still have to write the parallel narrative that runs alongside the main story! I think the final word count is likely to be about 120,000 words - which will make this book the longest of all my novels.

It struck me this morning that I've not made it easy for myself with my novels because they all have different point of views and structures:

HEAVEN CAN WAIT - first person point of view, past tense, hero's journey

HOME FOR CHRISTMAS - two alternating first person point of views (there was a 3rd person POV too but that was cut during the edit), past tense, 3 Act Structure

NOVEL 3 - first person point of view, present tense, parallel narrative, 3 Act Structure

For me HEAVEN CAN WAIT was definitely most straightforward of the three to write, structure-wise.

What have you used in your novels? Have you tried using different POVs and structures? Any you found easier than others? What are you going to choose for your next novel? Any you'd never do again?


- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

10 comments:

Suzanne Furness said...

Oh the question of POV! My current WIP is a teen fantasy written from 3 points of view. The biggest challenge I find is avoiding 'head hopping' mind scene/chapter. Funnily, when I write short stories I tend to go for first person present tense. Whichever way we choose it certainly has a massive impact on the finished piece. Sometimes I don't make the decision before I start writing it just evolves that way! I'm not scatty, honestly, it's just the way it works for me!

Cally Taylor said...

Suzanne - that makes total sense! I often don't know which POV I'm going to choose for a short story until I get the first line in my head.

Guy Saville said...

AFRIKA REICH is 3rd person, past tense with 6 POVs and a 'narrator' who interjects to explain the alternative history. As my current novel is a follow up (and to keep things consistent) I'm basically stuck with the same form.

I'm hoping with the book after that to try something different: a first person narrative, probably from a woman's POV.

Great that your book is coming on well, Cally. You'll have reached 120K in no time. You might also be amused to know I wrote 220K words of my WIP... before giving up and starting from scratch. Not recommended!

Cally Taylor said...

Guy -220k written and then scrapped?! Good god*has an attack of the vapours* Did you start the same story again or something new? I don't think I could find it in me to write the same story twice. Interesting choice for your next book. I really enjoyed writing from Matt's pov in HOME FOR CHRISTMAS, there's something very freeing about writing from the opposite sex's pov.

Cara Cooper said...

Hi Cally - I'm half way through a serial for People's Friend at the mo. 4 instalments accepted and struggling with 5. I started off with only two POVs, hero and heroine. When I tried to bring in another, they wouldn't let me! It's made it difficult but I will get there in the end. I like multiple POV's and only ever do a single POV for short stories. For them I quite like it, it seems to go with the short length! Good luck with yours.

Cally Taylor said...

Cara - I know what you mean. It can be tricky sustaining only one or two POVs for an entire novel, much easier in a short story. We got into a discussion about POV yesterday and Essie Fox said she'd recently met someone who wouldn't buy a book if it was in the first person. Maybe sone readers don't like being in just one person's head for an entire novel?

Rebecca Alexander said...

I think I'm at the same point in my novel. A Baby's Bones is one POV, third person, past tense, through a contemporary strand, with five big scenes to write. The other strand is historical, first person, present tense. I'm just finishing one strand but I have 40k of the historical strand still to write! Good luck with it!

Cally Taylor said...

Rebecca - I love that you're mixing up the povs and tenses of your different strands. Would be curious to know which you found easier when you've finished.

Publishing a book said...

I am happy to read about your blog on writing, thanks!

Guy Saville said...

It was quite a brave decision to scrap... but I was so unhappy with what I'd written that I thought it was the lesser of the two evils. I'd rather publish a book I was happy with and take a long time, than meet my deadline with something I wasn't 100% satisfied with.

Just about to answer your question on my latest blog...